More concentrated w(h)ining.

One of my recommendations / observations from the wine staining experience was to concentrate the wine a little bit to see if it helped darken the color quicker.

After I gifted the first wine-stained wine 6-pack carrier I made, my sister-in-law started showing it off.  Low-and-behold, one of her friends decided she wanted two of them.  This presents me with the perfect opportunity to try out my (hopeful) improvements.

Unfortunately, I used up all of the old bench wood I had on the first wine carrier, so I had to look around the woodshop for other materials to reuse.  I had pallet pieces laying around from a paper company here in town which has more then they can handle.  Every time I go in there it’s like walking into an episode of the Office and they love it there.  Pallets is something I have on hand to make flags, benches, etc., so it will be carrier #1.

The other wood I had lying around was from a fence I took down years ago and re-used once already to make a stand up planter for my wife.  The planter ended up falling apart (from lack of wood glue.  This was long before the woodshop started and I learned my lesson, the hard way in this case).  So the ceder from the fencing will be re-re-used into wine carrier #2.

Pre-step: construct 6-pack wine-carriers.  I stuck to the same design and methodology, so check out the other page for the details.

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This is how I help the carrier stay square while glue dries. Shop weights!

First step: the wine.  Last time I started with a cheap bottle of wine, but I don’t think 750 mL will do it this time since it has to cover two carriers and be boiled down.  I picked up a 3 L box of cabernet sauvignon at a deep discount.  I actually like this stuff and am sad to see it go to “waste,” but at least it’s going back to California, albeit in a completely different form and function.

Step two: concentrate the stain.  I emptied the plastic bag inside the box directly into my mouth, err… a pot to be reduced (in kitchen speak).  It boiled down for about a couple hours which reduced the volume by about half and made the house smell like a winery for a couple of days.

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Step three: application.  I went back to the cooler soak method and it worked great.  Basically put the carrier in the cooler with the concentrated stain and get it soaked evenly.

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The ceder was really really dry and soaked up the stain quick and deep.  It went from brown to purple-red in one or two treatments.   The pallet pine took three or four more treatments, but the concentrated stain worked just as well with a third as many treatments.

Here is the outcome:

W3_WineStained6Pack.jpg

Pallet pine is on the left and Fence cedar on the right.

I think they came out great and the concentrated stain worked just as well as the first one, but it fewer treatments.

Lessons learned:
1) Wine bottles are not standard.  After I built the first one, I tried to load it up with 6 bottles and learned some wineries use fatter or odd shaped bottles.  I don’t know if you can see it in the picture above, but I made the pallet carrier wider to accommodate all different shapes and sizes of bottles.
2) Family is your best asset.  My sister-in-law sold these to a friend by her word (and pictures) alone.  Never underestimate the power of loved-ones’ opinion of your work.

 

 

 

 

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This entry was published on June 2, 2014 at 10:54 pm. It’s filed under Construction and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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